Museum Island Open Spaces
Colonnade Courtyard Pergamonmuseum Spree Side New Courtyard The Pergamonmuseum’s Court of Honor Small Curiosities and Illuminated Spaces

Small Curiosities and Illuminations

Small Curiosities (visualization)
© SPK / ART+COM, 2015
In Planning

The Rugged Appeal of Industrial Architecture

Both the Pergamonmuseum and the Bode-Museum were only built after the construction of the railroad line which has run across the Museum Island since 1882. This situation in terms of urban development was taken into account by the respective architects, particularly with regard to planning the alignment of the buildings. The two alleys that emerged between the museums and the railway viaduct have a very distinct, almost industrial character which is in stark contrast to the other open spaces on the Museum Island. That is why the concept of the landscape architects’ office of Levin Monsigny emphasizes the individuality of that open space while, at the same time, integrating it into its environment.

© SPK / ART+COM, 2015

A View to be Enjoyed

At the end of the walkway between the Pergamonmuseum and the Bode-Museum, visitors are welcomed by two viewing balconies called the “Small Curiosities.” To the north and south of the railroad bridge, they protrude over the Kupfergraben. Visitors walking all the way there will be rewarded with a completely new view of the city. Towards the south, the cupola of the Humboldt-Forum will be visible as a distinctive landmark.

Illuminated space beneath the railway viaduct (visualization)
© SPK / ART+COM, 2012

Illuminated Spaces under the City Railroad

On their way from the Pergamonmuseum to the Bode-Museum visitors will be able to cross three spaces which are created by the pillars supporting the railroad viaduct. The spaces are distinguished by the steel of the bridge, which differs from the other building materials used on the island. This contrast will also become visible with night-time illumination. Bright yellow light will shine onto concrete panels on the floor, highlighting the strangeness of the place. The lighting is part of the overall illumination concept for the Museum Island, which is being planned by Conceptlicht GmbH Traunreut and realized by Lichtvision.